New York Times Promoting Sexualization Of Young Boys

Fellowship of the Minds – by DCG

On Saturday, writer Bee Shapiro published an article in The New York Timesentitled, “His Eye Makeup is Way Better Than Yours.

The Timestweeted it as such: “How teenage boys (and younger) wearing makeup are affecting beauty norms.”

The article shows many pictures of young boys making themselves pretty with makeup. Imagine the outcry if they had done this with young girls, trying to make them look “pretty.”  

young boy wearing makeupI don’t care how this author and The New York Times wants to spin this gender bender baloney. The fact that they found some young boys who desire to wear makeup does NOT make it the “norm.”

Excerpts from Bee’s article:

Would you be inclined to buy makeup because a 10-year-old boy is showing you how to create a look on Instagram? If we’re talking about Jack Bennett of @makeuupbyjack, then the answer could well be a resounding yes.

Since convincing his mother to start his account in May, young Mr. Bennett, who lives in Berkshire, England, has amassed 331,000 followers and attracted the attention of brands like MAC and NYX, which have offered products to create looks. Refinery29 has celebrated him as the next big thing in makeup.

He is the latest evidence of a seismic power shift in the beauty industry, which has thrust social media influencers to the top of the pecking order. Refreshingly, they come in all shapes, sizes, ages and, more recently, genders. Hailed by Marie Claire as the “beauty boys of Instagram,” the early male pioneers, like Patrick Simondac (@PatrickStarrr), Jeffree Star(@jeffreestar) and Manny Gutierrez, (@MannyMua733), have transcended niche to become juggernauts with millions of followers. And their aesthetic is decidedly new: neither old-school-rocker makeup nor drag queen.

“When you post an Instagram or YouTube video, it’s similar to ‘RuPaul’s Drag Race,’ where you can see the humanity of the contestants and see their struggles,” he said. “It helps show viewers that we’re just people.” He paused and giggled: “And it’s beauty, it’s just fun. Patrick is a walking rainbow.”

Men like Mr. Starrr have since influenced a new generation of young men who are wearing makeup and posting about it. According to the Instagram data team, there has been a 20 percent increase since the start of the year in mentions of “makeup” by male accounts on the platform.

In only a couple of years, these young men have gained sway in the industry. Cosmetics brands like Milk Makeup have built their offerings on genderless beauty; the skin-care company Glow Recipe hosts sold-out boy beauty mask classes; and in the fragrance aisle, unisex scent houses continue to grow.

“If you’re amazing at applying makeup, it doesn’t matter how old you are or what gender you identify with,” she said. “If you’re young, already embracing who you are and are insanely talented, those factors will make you stand out even more.”

Though the younger generation of influencers are of diverse molds, they are similar in that they take men wearing makeup as a given. “I didn’t think about gender identity, what you do with your life, things you associate yourself with,” Mr. Warden said, referring to the time he started his Instagram posts. “I think no matter what gender, you are free to do what you want.”

“What you have now are millennial moms who have grown up in an era where gender is more fluid,” Ms. Friedman said. “Millennials are very in tune with empowering their children.” For example, she sees a wide range of hair lengths on boys. “It’s not unusual for boys to sit in the chair, take out an iPhone and show a picture of what they want their hair to look like,” she said, adding that they start around age 6. “There are many role models for them to look to now.”

Read the whole article here.

h/t Twitchy

DCG

Fellowship of the Minds

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